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Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.0029
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marketa Zimova, L. Scott Mills, Paul M. Lukacs, Michael S. Mitchell

Abstract

As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 157 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 17%
Student > Bachelor 24 15%
Researcher 23 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 5%
Other 18 11%
Unknown 18 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 97 60%
Environmental Science 24 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 1%
Other 6 4%
Unknown 24 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2019.
All research outputs
#1,340,655
of 17,355,315 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,252
of 8,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,912
of 194,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#65
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,355,315 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,712 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.