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Chromosome painting among Proboscidea, Hyracoidea and Sirenia: support for Paenungulata (Afrotheria, Mammalia) but not Tethytheria

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2007
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Title
Chromosome painting among Proboscidea, Hyracoidea and Sirenia: support for Paenungulata (Afrotheria, Mammalia) but not Tethytheria
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2007
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2007.0088
Pubmed ID
Authors

A.T Pardini, P.C.M O'Brien, B Fu, R.K Bonde, F.F.B Elder, M.A Ferguson-Smith, F Yang, T.J Robinson

Abstract

Despite marked improvements in the interpretation of systematic relationships within Eutheria, particular nodes, including Paenungulata (Hyracoidea, Sirenia and Proboscidea), remain ambiguous. The combination of a rapid radiation, a deep divergence and an extensive morphological diversification has resulted in a limited phylogenetic signal confounding resolution within this clade both at the morphological and nucleotide levels. Cross-species chromosome painting was used to delineate regions of homology between Loxodonta africana (2n=56), Procavia capensis (2n=54), Trichechus manatus latirostris (2n=48) and an outgroup taxon, the aardvark (Orycteropus afer, 2n=20). Changes specific to each lineage were identified and although the presence of a minimum of 11 synapomorphies confirmed the monophyly of Paenungulata, no change characterizing intrapaenungulate relationships was evident. The reconstruction of an ancestral paenungulate karyotype and the estimation of rates of chromosomal evolution indicate a reduced rate of genomic repatterning following the paenungulate radiation. In comparison to data available for other mammalian taxa, the paenungulate rate of chromosomal evolution is slow to moderate. As a consequence, the absence of a chromosomal character uniting two paenungulates (at the level of resolution characterized in this study) may be due to a reduced rate of chromosomal change relative to the length of time separating successive divergence events.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 5%
South Africa 1 1%
Peru 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Botswana 1 1%
India 1 1%
Unknown 73 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 19%
Student > Master 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 22 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 67%
Environmental Science 12 14%
Unspecified 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2014.
All research outputs
#7,727,379
of 12,367,026 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#6,482
of 7,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,823
of 194,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#97
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,026 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.