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Tick-borne encephalitis virus in ticks detached from humans and follow-up of serological and clinical response

Overview of attention for article published in Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
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Title
Tick-borne encephalitis virus in ticks detached from humans and follow-up of serological and clinical response
Published in
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
DOI 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2013.07.009
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The risk of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection after a tick bite remains largely unknown. To address this, we investigated the presence of TBEV in ticks detached from humans in an attempt to relate viral copy number, TBEV subtype, and tick feeding time with the serological and clinical response of the tick-bitten participants. Ticks, blood samples, and questionnaires were collected from tick-bitten humans at 34 primary health care centers in Sweden and in the Åland Islands (Finland). A total of 2167 ticks was received from 1886 persons in 2008-2009. Using a multiplex quantitative real-time PCR, 5 TBEV-infected ticks were found (overall prevalence 0.23%, copy range <4×10(2)-7.7×10(6)per tick). One unvaccinated person bitten by a tick containing 7.7×10(6) TBEV copies experienced symptoms. Another unvaccinated person bitten by a tick containing 1.8×10(3) TBEV copies developed neither symptoms nor TBEV antibodies. The remaining 3 persons were protected by vaccination. In contrast, despite lack of TBEV in the detached ticks, 2 persons developed antibodies against TBEV, one of whom reported symptoms. Overall, a low risk of TBEV infection was observed, and too few persons got bitten by TBEV-infected ticks to draw certain conclusions regarding the clinical outcome in relation to the duration of the blood meal and virus copy number. However, this study indicates that an antibody response may develop without clinical symptoms, that a bite by an infected tick not always leads to an antibody response or clinical symptoms, and a possible correlation between virus load and tick feeding time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 5%
Russian Federation 1 5%
Spain 1 5%
Hungary 1 5%
Unknown 15 79%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 32%
Researcher 3 16%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 32%
Unspecified 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2014.
All research outputs
#4,643,303
of 5,569,395 outputs
Outputs from Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
#395
of 505 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,661
of 132,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
#11
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,569,395 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 505 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.