↓ Skip to main content

Ticks infesting captive and free-roaming wild animal species at the São Paulo Zoo, São Paulo, Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Ticks infesting captive and free-roaming wild animal species at the São Paulo Zoo, São Paulo, Brazil
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, July 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1984-29612017036
Pubmed ID
Authors

Irys Hany Lima Gonzalez, Marcelo Bahia Labruna, Carolina Romeiro Fernandes Chagas, Paula Andrea Borges Salgado, Cauê Monticelli, Luan Henrique Morais, Amanda Alves de Moraes, Thatiane Cristina Antunes, Patrícia Locosque Ramos, Thiago Fernandes Martins

Abstract

Ticks are ectoparasites of worldwide distribution that affect vertebrates and can transmit pathogens to animals and humans. The Zoological Park Foundation of São Paulo (FPZSP) is located in a Conservation Unit in one of the most important remaining fragments of the Atlantic Rainforest biome in the suburbs of São Paulo, Brazil. The FPZSP houses more than 3,000 wild animals on exhibit, in breeding programs and in environmental education programs, and also attracts migratory birds and free-roaming wildlife. This study focused on identifying the diversity of tick species that infest captive and free-roaming animals at the FPZSP. The collection of ticks kept at the FPZSP contains 523 specimens that were collected from different host species between 1990 and 2017. Ten tick species were found. In addition, Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas) was found on stray cats living in the Atlantic forest fragment in the FPZSP. This study reveals a low occurrence of parasitism in captive animals and a high diversity of tick species collected from hosts in this Atlantic forest fragment, contributing information about host-parasite relationships and potential vectors of zoonotic diseases, since the vectors of Brazilian spotted fever, A. aureolatum and Amblyomma sculptum Berlese, were found in some hosts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 10 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 33%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 19%
Environmental Science 5 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2018.
All research outputs
#17,426,707
of 21,562,248 outputs
Outputs from Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária
#14
of 32 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#213,233
of 282,618 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,562,248 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 32 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.8. This one scored the same or higher as 18 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,618 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.