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Posttraumatic stress disorder: a serious post-earthquake complication

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, June 2017
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Title
Posttraumatic stress disorder: a serious post-earthquake complication
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, June 2017
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2016-0029
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mudassir Farooqui, Syed A. Quadri, Sajid S. Suriya, Muhammad Adnan Khan, Muhammad Ovais, Zohaib Sohail, Samra Shoaib, Hassaan Tohid, Muhammad Hassan

Abstract

Earthquakes are unpredictable and devastating natural disasters. They can cause massive destruction and loss of life and survivors may suffer psychological symptoms of severe intensity. Our goal in this article is to review studies published in the last 20 years to compile what is known about posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurring after earthquakes. The review also describes other psychiatric complications that can be associated with earthquakes, to provide readers with better overall understanding, and discusses several sociodemographic factors that can be associated with post-earthquake PTSD. A search for literature was conducted on major databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO and in neurology and psychiatry journals, and many other medical journals. Terms used for electronic searches included, but were not limited to, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), posttraumatic symptoms, anxiety, depression, major depressive disorder, earthquake, and natural disaster. The relevant information was then utilized to determine the relationships between earthquakes and posttraumatic stress symptoms. It was found that PTSD is the most commonly occurring mental health condition among earthquake survivors. Major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social phobia, and specific phobias were also listed. The PTSD prevalence rate varied widely. It was dependent on multiple risk factors in target populations and also on the interval of time that had elapsed between the exposure to the deadly incident and measurement. Females seemed to be the most widely-affected group, while elderly people and young children exhibit considerable psychosocial impact.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Researcher 3 5%
Other 3 5%
Student > Master 2 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 40 71%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Linguistics 1 2%
Unknown 41 73%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2019.
All research outputs
#13,916,538
of 17,444,955 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#66
of 117 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,782
of 272,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,444,955 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 117 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.