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In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants

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Cover of 'In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants'

Table of Contents

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    Book Overview
  2. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 1 A Comparison of In Vitro and In Vivo Asexual Embryogenesis.
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    Chapter 2 Somatic Versus Zygotic Embryogenesis: Learning from Seeds.
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    Chapter 3 Recent Advances on Genetic and Physiological Bases of In Vitro Somatic Embryo Formation.
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    Chapter 4 Do Mitochondria Play a Central Role in Stress-Induced Somatic Embryogenesis?
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    Chapter 5 Dying with Style: Death Decision in Plant Embryogenesis.
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    Chapter 6 Somatic Embryogenesis in Broad-Leaf Woody Plants: What We Can Learn from Proteomics
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    Chapter 7 Advances in Conifer Somatic Embryogenesis Since Year 2000.
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    Chapter 8 Molecular Aspects of Conifer Zygotic and Somatic Embryo Development: A Review of Genome-Wide Approaches and Recent Insights.
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    Chapter 9 Androgenesis in Solanaceae
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    Chapter 10 Bioreactors for Plant Embryogenesis and Beyond
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    Chapter 11 Somatic Embryogenesis and Genetic Modification of Vitis
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    Chapter 12 Somatic Embryogenesis in Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes) Using Different Explant Sources.
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    Chapter 13 Somatic Embryogenesis: Still a Relevant Technique in Citrus Improvement
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    Chapter 14 Somatic Embryogenesis Induction and Plant Regeneration in Strawberry Tree ( Arbutus unedo L.)
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    Chapter 15 Somatic Embryogenesis in Olive ( Olea europaea L. subsp. europaea var. sativa and var. sylvestris )
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    Chapter 16 Somatic Embryogenesis in Crocus sativus L.
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    Chapter 17 In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants
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    Chapter 18 In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants
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    Chapter 19 In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants
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    Chapter 20 Somatic Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration of Brachiaria brizantha
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    Chapter 21 Somatic Embryogenesis in Pinus spp.
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    Chapter 22 Somatic Embryogenesis of Abies cephalonica Loud.
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    Chapter 23 Somatic Embryogenesis in Horse Chestnut ( Aesculus hippocastanum L.)
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    Chapter 24 Somatic Embryogenesis in Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol.) Kuntze (Araucariaceae)
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    Chapter 25 Anther Culture in Eggplant ( Solanum melongena L.)
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    Chapter 26 Anther Culture in Pepper ( Capsicum annuum L.)
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    Chapter 27 Microspore Embryogenesis Through Anther Culture in Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.
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    Chapter 28 Detection of Epigenetic Modifications During Microspore Embryogenesis: Analysis of DNA Methylation Patterns Dynamics.
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    Chapter 29 In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants
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    Chapter 30 From Somatic Embryo to Synthetic Seed in Citrus spp. Through the Encapsulation Technology
  32. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 31 From Stress to Embryos: Some of the Problems for Induction and Maturation of Somatic Embryos
  33. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 32 Cryotechniques for the Long-Term Conservation of Embryogenic Cultures from Woody Plants
Attention for Chapter 12: Somatic Embryogenesis in Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes) Using Different Explant Sources.
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Chapter title
Somatic Embryogenesis in Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes) Using Different Explant Sources.
Chapter number 12
Book title
In Vitro Embryogenesis in Higher Plants
Published in
Methods in molecular biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4939-3061-6_12
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-1-4939-3060-9, 978-1-4939-3061-6
Authors

Steinmacher, Douglas A, Heringer, Angelo Schuabb, Jiménez, Víctor M, Quoirin, Marguerite G G, Guerra, Miguel P, Douglas A. Steinmacher, Angelo Schuabb Heringer, Víctor M. Jiménez, Marguerite G. G. Quoirin, Miguel P. Guerra

Abstract

Peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is a member of the family Arecaceae and is a multipurpose but underutilized species. Nowadays, fruit production for subsistence and local markets, and heart-of-palm production for local, national, and international markets are the most important uses of this plant. Conventional breeding programs in peach palm are long-term efforts due to the prolonged generation time, large plant size, difficulties with controlled pollination and other factors. Although it is a caespitose palm, its propagation is currently based on seeds, as off-shoots are difficult to root. Hence, tissue culture techniques are considered to be the most likely strategy for efficient clonal plantlet regeneration of this species. Among various techniques, somatic embryogenesis offers the advantages of potential automated large-scale production and putative genetic stability of the regenerated plantlets. The induction of somatic embryogenesis in peach palm can be achieved by using different explant sources including zygotic embryos, immature inflorescences and thin cell layers from the young leaves and shoot meristems. The choice of a particular explant depends on whether clonal propagation is desired or not, as well as on the plant conditions and availability of explants. Protocols to induce and express somatic embryogenesis from different peach palm explants, up to acclimatization of plantlets, are described in this chapter.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Professor 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Other 2 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 57%
Engineering 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%

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