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Size and frequency of natural forest disturbances and the Amazon forest carbon balance

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
30 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
118 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
375 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Size and frequency of natural forest disturbances and the Amazon forest carbon balance
Published in
Nature Communications, March 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4434
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fernando D.B. Espírito-Santo, Manuel Gloor, Michael Keller, Yadvinder Malhi, Sassan Saatchi, Bruce Nelson, Raimundo C. Oliveira Junior, Cleuton Pereira, Jon Lloyd, Steve Frolking, Michael Palace, Yosio E. Shimabukuro, Valdete Duarte, Abel Monteagudo Mendoza, Gabriela López-González, Tim R. Baker, Ted R. Feldpausch, Roel J.W. Brienen, Gregory P. Asner, Doreen S. Boyd, Oliver L. Phillips

Abstract

Forest inventory studies in the Amazon indicate a large terrestrial carbon sink. However, field plots may fail to represent forest mortality processes at landscape-scales of tropical forests. Here we characterize the frequency distribution of disturbance events in natural forests from 0.01 ha to 2,651 ha size throughout Amazonia using a novel combination of forest inventory, airborne lidar and satellite remote sensing data. We find that small-scale mortality events are responsible for aboveground biomass losses of ~1.7 Pg C y(-1) over the entire Amazon region. We also find that intermediate-scale disturbances account for losses of ~0.2 Pg C y(-1), and that the largest-scale disturbances as a result of blow-downs only account for losses of ~0.004 Pg C y(-1). Simulation of growth and mortality indicates that even when all carbon losses from intermediate and large-scale disturbances are considered, these are outweighed by the net biomass accumulation by tree growth, supporting the inference of an Amazon carbon sink.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 375 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 11 3%
United States 8 2%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 343 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 21%
Researcher 80 21%
Student > Master 58 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 27 7%
Student > Postgraduate 20 5%
Other 76 20%
Unknown 34 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 136 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 101 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 55 15%
Engineering 9 2%
Social Sciences 4 1%
Other 18 5%
Unknown 52 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 89. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2019.
All research outputs
#241,174
of 15,768,878 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#4,181
of 30,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,709
of 224,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#37
of 290 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,768,878 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,823 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 290 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.