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Embodied cognition and the cerebellum: Perspectives from the Dysmetria of Thought and the Universal Cerebellar Transform theories

Overview of attention for article published in Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior, March 2018
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Title
Embodied cognition and the cerebellum: Perspectives from the Dysmetria of Thought and the Universal Cerebellar Transform theories
Published in
Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior, March 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.07.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xavier Guell, John D.E. Gabrieli, Jeremy D. Schmahmann

Abstract

In this report, we analyze the relationship between embodied cognition and current theories of the cerebellum, particularly the Dysmetria of Thought theory and the concept of the Universal Cerebellar Transform (UCT). First, we describe the UCT and the Dysmetria of Thought theories, highlight evidence supporting these hypotheses and discuss their mechanisms, functions and relevance. We then propose the following relationships. (i) The UCT strengthens embodied cognition because it provides an example of embodiment where the nature and intensity of the dependence between cognitive, affective and sensorimotor processes are defined. (ii) Conversely, embodied cognition bolsters the UCT theory because it contextualizes a cerebellum-focused theory within a general neurological theory. (iii) Embodied cognition supports the extension to other brain regions of the principles of organization of cerebral cortical connections that underlie the UCT: The notion that cytoarchitectonically determined transforms manifest via connectivity as sensorimotor, cognitive and affective functions resonates with the embodiment thesis that cognitive, affective and sensorimotor systems are interdependent. (iv) Embodied cognition might shape future definitions of the UCT because embodiment redefines the relationship between the neurological systems modulated by the UCT. We conclude by analyzing the relationship between our hypotheses and the concept of syntax and action semantics deficits in motor diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 95 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 19%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Postgraduate 11 12%
Professor 8 8%
Other 26 27%
Unknown 7 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 32 34%
Psychology 17 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 16 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,625,032
of 11,566,328 outputs
Outputs from Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior
#1,075
of 1,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,033
of 261,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior
#54
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,566,328 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,634 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.