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Reduced disease in black abalone following mass mortality: phage therapy and natural selection

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, March 2014
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Reduced disease in black abalone following mass mortality: phage therapy and natural selection
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, March 2014
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00078
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolyn S. Friedman, Nathan Wight, Lisa M. Crosson, Glenn R. VanBlaricom, Kevin D. Lafferty

Abstract

Black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii, populations along the NE Pacific ocean have declined due to the rickettsial disease withering syndrome (WS). Natural recovery on San Nicolas Island (SNI) of Southern California suggested the development of resistance in island populations. Experimental challenges in one treatment demonstrated that progeny of disease-selected black abalone from SNI survived better than did those from naïve black abalone from Carmel Point in mainland coastal central California. Unexpectedly, the presence of a newly observed bacteriophage infecting the WS rickettsia (WS-RLO) had strong effects on the survival of infected abalone. Specifically, presence of phage-infected RLO (RLOv) reduced the host response to infection, RLO infection loads, and associated mortality. These data suggest that the black abalone: WS-RLO relationship is evolving through dual host mechanisms of resistance to RLO infection in the digestive gland via tolerance to infection in the primary target tissue (the post-esophagus) coupled with reduced pathogenicity of the WS-RLO by phage infection, which effectively reduces the infection load in the primary target tissue by half. Sea surface temperature patterns off southern California, associated with a recent hiatus in global-scale ocean warming, do not appear to be a sufficient explanation for survival patterns in SNI black abalone. These data highlight the potential for natural recovery of abalone populations over time and that further understanding of mechanisms governing host-parasite relationships will better enable us to manage declining populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Switzerland 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 74 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 18%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Unspecified 5 6%
Other 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 50%
Environmental Science 10 13%
Unspecified 9 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Other 8 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2014.
All research outputs
#7,541,753
of 12,506,736 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#5,061
of 9,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,809
of 217,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#85
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,506,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.