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Primary care workforce and continuous medical education in China: lessons to learn from a nationwide cross-sectional survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, July 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Primary care workforce and continuous medical education in China: lessons to learn from a nationwide cross-sectional survey
Published in
BMJ Open, July 2017
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015145
Pubmed ID
Authors

William C W Wong, ShanZhu Zhu, Jason J Ong, MingHui Peng, Cindy L K Lam, Michael R Kidd, Martin Roland, SunFang Jiang

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the education and training background of Chinese community health centres (CHCs) staff, continuous medical education (CME) and factors affecting participation in CME. Cross-sectional survey. Community health centres (CHCs). All doctors and nurses working in selected CHCs (excluding those solely practising traditional Chinese Medicine). CME recorded by CHCs and self-reported CME participation. A stratified random sample of CHCs based on geographical distribution and 2:1 urban-suburban ratio was selected covering three major regions of China. Two questionnaires, one for lead clinicians and another for frontline health professionals, were administered between September-December 2015, covering the demographics of clinic staff, staff training and CME activities. 149 lead clinicians (response rate 79%) and 1734 doctors and 1846 nurses completed the survey (response rate 86%). Of the doctors, 54.5% had a bachelor degree and only 47% were registered as general practitioners (GPs). Among the doctors, 10.5% carried senior titles. Few nurses (4.6%) had training in primary care. Those who have reported participating in CME were 91.6% doctors and 89.2% nurses. CME participation in doctors was more commonly reported by older doctors, females, those who were registered as a GP and those with intermediate or senior job titles. CME participation in nurses was more common among those with a bachelor degree or intermediate/senior job titles or those with longer working experience in the CHC. Only half of doctors have bachelor degrees or are registered as GPs as their prime registration in the primary care workforce in China. The vast majority of CHC staff participated in CME but there is room for improvement in how CME is organised.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 33%
Unspecified 3 20%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Professor 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 27%
Neuroscience 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,358,187
of 12,282,239 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#5,498
of 9,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,280
of 232,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#229
of 402 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,282,239 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,527 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.2. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,057 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 402 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.