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The Good, the Bad, and the Just: Justice Sensitivity Predicts Neural Response during Moral Evaluation of Actions Performed by Others

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
599 tweeters
facebook
39 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
104 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
295 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The Good, the Bad, and the Just: Justice Sensitivity Predicts Neural Response during Moral Evaluation of Actions Performed by Others
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, March 2014
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.4648-13.2014
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. J. Yoder, J. Decety

Abstract

Morality is a fundamental component of human cultures and has been defined as prescriptive norms regarding how people should treat one another, including concepts such as justice, fairness, and rights. Using fMRI, the current study examined the extent to which dispositions in justice sensitivity (i.e., how individuals react to experiences of injustice and unfairness) predict behavioral ratings of praise and blame and how they modulate the online neural response and functional connectivity when participants evaluate morally laden (good and bad) everyday actions. Justice sensitivity did not impact the neuro-hemodynamic response in the action-observation network but instead influenced higher-order computational nodes in the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ), right dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC, dmPFC) that process mental states understanding and maintain goal representations. Activity in these regions predicted praise and blame ratings. Further, the hemodynamic response in rTPJ showed a differentiation between good and bad actions 2 s before the response in rdlPFC. Evaluation of good actions was specifically associated with enhanced activity in dorsal striatum and increased the functional coupling between the rTPJ and the anterior cingulate cortex. Together, this study provides important knowledge in how individual differences in justice sensitivity impact neural computations that support psychological processes involved in moral judgment and mental-state reasoning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 599 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 295 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
France 3 1%
Spain 3 1%
Australia 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 273 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 69 23%
Researcher 61 21%
Student > Master 37 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 27 9%
Student > Bachelor 25 8%
Other 50 17%
Unknown 26 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 147 50%
Neuroscience 29 10%
Social Sciences 19 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 3%
Other 35 12%
Unknown 38 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 413. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2018.
All research outputs
#51,177
of 21,425,694 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#51
of 22,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#395
of 204,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#3
of 303 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,425,694 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,657 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 303 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.