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Is a healthy ecosystem one that is rich in parasites?

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Ecology & Evolution, July 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
411 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1104 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
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Title
Is a healthy ecosystem one that is rich in parasites?
Published in
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, July 2006
DOI 10.1016/j.tree.2006.04.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter J. Hudson, Andrew P. Dobson, Kevin D. Lafferty

Abstract

Historically, the role of parasites in ecosystem functioning has been considered trivial because a cursory examination reveals that their relative biomass is low compared with that of other trophic groups. However there is increasing evidence that parasite-mediated effects could be significant: they shape host population dynamics, alter interspecific competition, influence energy flow and appear to be important drivers of biodiversity. Indeed they influence a range of ecosystem functions and have a major effect on the structure of some food webs. Here, we consider the bottom-up and top-down processes of how parasitism influences ecosystem functioning and show that there is evidence that parasites are important for biodiversity and production; thus, we consider a healthy system to be one that is rich in parasite species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 28 3%
Brazil 15 1%
Mexico 7 <1%
South Africa 6 <1%
France 6 <1%
Chile 5 <1%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Germany 5 <1%
Poland 4 <1%
Other 34 3%
Unknown 989 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 288 26%
Researcher 205 19%
Student > Master 192 17%
Student > Bachelor 120 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 59 5%
Other 189 17%
Unknown 51 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 754 68%
Environmental Science 155 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 15 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 1%
Other 44 4%
Unknown 86 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 84. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2019.
All research outputs
#200,117
of 13,603,158 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Ecology & Evolution
#119
of 2,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,180
of 190,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Ecology & Evolution
#6
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,603,158 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,269 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.