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Investigating the running abilities ofTyrannosaurus rexusing stress-constrained multibody dynamic analysis

Overview of attention for article published in PeerJ, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 5,994)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
63 news outlets
blogs
12 blogs
twitter
1000 tweeters
facebook
19 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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Title
Investigating the running abilities ofTyrannosaurus rexusing stress-constrained multibody dynamic analysis
Published in
PeerJ, July 2017
DOI 10.7717/peerj.3420
Pubmed ID
Authors

William I. Sellers, Stuart B. Pond, Charlotte A. Brassey, Philip L. Manning, Karl T. Bates

Abstract

The running ability of Tyrannosaurus rex has been intensively studied due to its relevance to interpretations of feeding behaviour and the biomechanics of scaling in giant predatory dinosaurs. Different studies using differing methodologies have produced a very wide range of top speed estimates and there is therefore a need to develop techniques that can improve these predictions. Here we present a new approach that combines two separate biomechanical techniques (multibody dynamic analysis and skeletal stress analysis) to demonstrate that true running gaits would probably lead to unacceptably high skeletal loads in T. rex. Combining these two approaches reduces the high-level of uncertainty in previous predictions associated with unknown soft tissue parameters in dinosaurs, and demonstrates that the relatively long limb segments of T. rex-long argued to indicate competent running ability-would actually have mechanically limited this species to walking gaits. Being limited to walking speeds contradicts arguments of high-speed pursuit predation for the largest bipedal dinosaurs like T. rex, and demonstrates the power of multiphysics approaches for locomotor reconstructions of extinct animals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,000 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 33%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Other 5 10%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 38%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 25%
Unspecified 5 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1272. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,781
of 12,284,372 outputs
Outputs from PeerJ
#5
of 5,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107
of 266,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PeerJ
#1
of 337 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,284,372 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,994 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 337 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.