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Periodic variability in cetacean strandings: links to large-scale climate events

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, January 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
213 Mendeley
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Title
Periodic variability in cetacean strandings: links to large-scale climate events
Published in
Biology Letters, January 2005
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2005.0313
Pubmed ID
Authors

K Evans, R Thresher, R.M Warneke, C.J.A Bradshaw, M Pook, D Thiele, M.A Hindell, K. Evans, R. Thresher, R.M. Warneke, C.J.A. Bradshaw, M. Pook, D. Thiele, M.A. Hindell

Abstract

Cetacean strandings elicit much community and scientific interest, but few quantitative analyses have successfully identified environmental correlates to these phenomena. Data spanning 1920-2002, involving a total of 639 stranding events and 39 taxa groups from southeast Australia, were found to demonstrate a clear 11-13- year periodicity in the number of events through time. These data positively correlated with the regional persistence of both zonal (westerly) and meridional (southerly) winds, reflecting general long-term and large-scale shifts in sea-level pressure gradients. Periods of persistent zonal and meridional winds result in colder and presumably nutrient-rich waters being driven closer to southern Australia, resulting in increased biological activity in the water column during the spring months. These observations suggest that large-scale climatic events provide a powerful distal influence on the propensity for whales to strand in this region. These patterns provide a powerful quantitative framework for testing hypotheses regarding environmental links to strandings and provide managers with a potential predictive tool to prepare for years of peak stranding activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 213 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 5 2%
United States 4 2%
Portugal 3 1%
Australia 3 1%
Mexico 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 189 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 63 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 17%
Student > Master 27 13%
Other 27 13%
Student > Bachelor 21 10%
Other 38 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 153 72%
Environmental Science 38 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 4%
Unspecified 3 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 <1%
Other 8 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2016.
All research outputs
#131,069
of 8,606,509 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#237
of 2,033 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,283
of 179,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#9
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,606,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,033 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 179,116 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.