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Comprehensive life cycle inventories of alternative wastewater treatment systems

Overview of attention for article published in Water Research, March 2010
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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176 Dimensions

Readers on

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400 Mendeley
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Title
Comprehensive life cycle inventories of alternative wastewater treatment systems
Published in
Water Research, March 2010
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2009.11.031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey Foley, David de Haas, Ken Hartley, Paul Lant

Abstract

Over recent decades, the environmental regulations on wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) have trended towards increasingly stringent nutrient removal requirements for the protection of local waterways. However, such regulations typically ignore other environmental impacts that might accompany apparent improvements to the WWTP. This paper quantitatively defines the life cycle inventory of resources consumed and emissions produced in ten different wastewater treatment scenarios (covering six process configurations and nine treatment standards). The inventory results indicate that infrastructure resources, operational energy, direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and chemical consumption generally increase with increasing nitrogen removal, especially at discharge standards of total nitrogen <5 mgN L(-1). Similarly, infrastructure resources and chemical consumption increase sharply with increasing phosphorus removal, but operational energy and direct GHG emissions are largely unaffected. These trends represent a trade-off of negative environmental impacts against improved local receiving water quality. However, increased phosphorus removal in WWTPs also represents an opportunity for increased resource recovery and reuse via biosolids applied to agricultural land. This study highlights that where biosolids displace synthetic fertilisers, a negative environmental trade-off may also occur by increasing the heavy metals discharged to soil. Proper analysis of these positive and negative environmental trade-offs requires further life cycle impact assessment and an inherently subjective weighting of competing environmental costs and benefits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 400 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 4 1%
United States 4 1%
Germany 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 370 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 99 25%
Student > Master 97 24%
Researcher 76 19%
Student > Bachelor 25 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 5%
Other 82 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 137 34%
Engineering 136 34%
Unspecified 61 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 5%
Chemical Engineering 11 3%
Other 36 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2014.
All research outputs
#7,053,208
of 12,269,726 outputs
Outputs from Water Research
#3,376
of 5,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,490
of 198,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Water Research
#20
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,726 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,590 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,074 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.