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Stress hormones predict a host superspreader phenotype in the West Nile virus system

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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38 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Stress hormones predict a host superspreader phenotype in the West Nile virus system
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2017
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2017.1090
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie S. Gervasi, Sarah C. Burgan, Erik Hofmeister, Thomas R. Unnasch, Lynn B. Martin

Abstract

Glucocorticoid stress hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT), have profound effects on the behaviour and physiology of organisms, and thus have the potential to alter host competence and the contributions of individuals to population- and community-level pathogen dynamics. For example, CORT could alter the rate of contacts among hosts, pathogens and vectors through its widespread effects on host metabolism and activity levels. CORT could also affect the intensity and duration of pathogen shedding and risk of host mortality during infection. We experimentally manipulated songbird CORT, asking how CORT affected behavioural and physiological responses to a standardized West Nile virus (WNV) challenge. Although all birds became infected after exposure to the virus, only birds with elevated CORT had viral loads at or above the infectious threshold. Moreover, though the rate of mortality was faster in birds with elevated CORT compared with controls, most hosts with elevated CORT survived past the day of peak infectiousness. CORT concentrations just prior to inoculation with WNV and anti-inflammatory cytokine concentrations following viral exposure were predictive of individual duration of infectiousness and the ability to maintain physical performance during infection (i.e. tolerance), revealing putative biomarkers of competence. Collectively, our results suggest that glucocorticoid stress hormones could directly and indirectly mediate the spread of pathogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 25%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Other 5 13%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 65%
Environmental Science 4 10%
Unspecified 2 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2017.
All research outputs
#616,595
of 12,887,439 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,911
of 7,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,511
of 262,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#60
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,887,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,277 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,306 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.