↓ Skip to main content

Human birth seasonality: latitudinal gradient and interplay with childhood disease dynamics

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
Human birth seasonality: latitudinal gradient and interplay with childhood disease dynamics
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.2438
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Martinez-Bakker, K. M. Bakker, A. A. King, P. Rohani

Abstract

More than a century of ecological studies have demonstrated the importance of demography in shaping spatial and temporal variation in population dynamics. Surprisingly, the impact of seasonal recruitment on infectious disease systems has received much less attention. Here, we present data encompassing 78 years of monthly natality in the USA, and reveal pronounced seasonality in birth rates, with geographical and temporal variation in both the peak birth timing and amplitude. The timing of annual birth pulses followed a latitudinal gradient, with northern states exhibiting spring/summer peaks and southern states exhibiting autumn peaks, a pattern we also observed throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Additionally, the amplitude of United States birth seasonality was more than twofold greater in southern states versus those in the north. Next, we examined the dynamical impact of birth seasonality on childhood disease incidence, using a mechanistic model of measles. Birth seasonality was found to have the potential to alter the magnitude and periodicity of epidemics, with the effect dependent on both birth peak timing and amplitude. In a simulation study, we fitted an susceptible-exposed-infected-recovered model to simulated data, and demonstrated that ignoring birth seasonality can bias the estimation of critical epidemiological parameters. Finally, we carried out statistical inference using historical measles incidence data from New York City. Our analyses did not identify the predicted systematic biases in parameter estimates. This may be owing to the well-known frequency-locking between measles epidemics and seasonal transmission rates, or may arise from substantial uncertainty in multiple model parameters and estimation stochasticity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 8%
Germany 2 2%
Australia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
Unknown 71 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 28%
Researcher 20 24%
Unspecified 7 8%
Student > Master 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 21 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 30%
Unspecified 14 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 14%
Mathematics 5 6%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Other 22 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 159. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2019.
All research outputs
#79,343
of 12,680,086 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#200
of 7,179 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,291
of 190,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#6
of 169 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,680,086 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,179 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 169 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.