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Basic local alignment search tool

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Molecular Biology, October 1990
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 10,073)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
52 tweeters
patent
3142 patents
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
19 Wikipedia pages
q&a
2 Q&A threads

Citations

dimensions_citation
56662 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16777 Mendeley
citeulike
178 CiteULike
connotea
19 Connotea
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Title
Basic local alignment search tool
Published in
Journal of Molecular Biology, October 1990
DOI 10.1016/s0022-2836(05)80360-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen F. Altschul, Warren Gish, Webb Miller, Eugene W. Myers, David J. Lipman

Abstract

A new approach to rapid sequence comparison, basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), directly approximates alignments that optimize a measure of local similarity, the maximal segment pair (MSP) score. Recent mathematical results on the stochastic properties of MSP scores allow an analysis of the performance of this method as well as the statistical significance of alignments it generates. The basic algorithm is simple and robust; it can be implemented in a number of ways and applied in a variety of contexts including straightforward DNA and protein sequence database searches, motif searches, gene identification searches, and in the analysis of multiple regions of similarity in long DNA sequences. In addition to its flexibility and tractability to mathematical analysis, BLAST is an order of magnitude faster than existing sequence comparison tools of comparable sensitivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16,777 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 237 1%
United Kingdom 119 <1%
Germany 115 <1%
Brazil 78 <1%
Spain 56 <1%
Canada 42 <1%
France 39 <1%
India 36 <1%
Colombia 27 <1%
Other 401 2%
Unknown 15627 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4233 25%
Student > Bachelor 2745 16%
Student > Master 2673 16%
Researcher 2662 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 857 5%
Other 2282 14%
Unknown 1325 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7740 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3505 21%
Computer Science 893 5%
Chemistry 451 3%
Environmental Science 446 3%
Other 1972 12%
Unknown 1770 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 113. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2020.
All research outputs
#169,808
of 15,124,696 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Molecular Biology
#12
of 10,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#699
of 92,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Molecular Biology
#1
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,124,696 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,073 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 92,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.