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Supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient: an integrative review

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, July 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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16 tweeters

Citations

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39 Dimensions

Readers on

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137 Mendeley
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Title
Supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient: an integrative review
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13098-017-0256-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Birgitte B. Bennich, Michael E. Røder, Dorthe Overgaard, Ingrid Egerod, Lene Munch, Filip K. Knop, Tina Vilsbøll, Hanne Konradsen

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes and its management affect the patient and the close family potentially causing either psychological distress or increased sense of responsibility and collaboration in these families. Interactions between patient and family play an important role in maintaining lifestyle changes and diabetes self-management. The purpose of this integrative review was to summarise and assess published studies on the intra-family perspective of supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient. Included in the review were published qualitative and quantitative studies that examined the intra-family perspective on supportive and non-supportive interactions. We searched the literature from 2000 to 2016 and the search strategy comprised the following databases: Cochrane, PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Psyc-ARTICLES as well as hand searching of reference lists. Quality assessment, data extraction and analysis were undertaken on all included studies. We identified five eligible research papers. Employing content analysis three categories describing interactions were refined: Impact of practical action, impact of emotional involvement, and impact of communication content. Supportive interactions included encouraging communication and family collaboration in managing diet, medications, and blood glucose checking. Non-supportive interactions were visible irritation, nagging behaviour and refusing to share the burden of living with diabetes. The findings stress the importance of including both patient and family in clinical practice to target diabetes self-management adherence and well-being of the whole family. The majority of self-management occurs within the family environment. Therefore, the intra-family perspective of supportive and non-supportive interactions should be understood and addressed as the family members are interdependent and affected by each other. Future research assessing the impact of professional support and the family function will have the potential to improve the daily life and well-being of patients with type 2 diabetes as well as the whole family.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 137 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 10%
Lecturer 14 10%
Student > Bachelor 14 10%
Student > Master 12 9%
Student > Postgraduate 10 7%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 53 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 36 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 17%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Psychology 4 3%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 49 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2021.
All research outputs
#3,030,245
of 21,467,894 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#90
of 607 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,021
of 288,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,467,894 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 607 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them