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The value of personalized psychosocial interventions to address behavioral and psychological symptoms in people with dementia living in care home settings: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in International Psychogeriatrics, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
89 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
Title
The value of personalized psychosocial interventions to address behavioral and psychological symptoms in people with dementia living in care home settings: a systematic review
Published in
International Psychogeriatrics, February 2014
DOI 10.1017/s1041610214000131
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ingelin Testad, Ann Corbett, Dag Aarsland, Kristin Osland Lexow, Jane Fossey, Bob Woods, Clive Ballard

Abstract

ABSTRACT Background: Several important systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on psychosocial interventions have been undertaken in the last decade. However, they have not focused specifically on the treatment of individual behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) with personalized interventions. This updated systematic review will focus on studies reporting the effect of personalized psychosocial interventions on key BPSD in care homes. Methods: Systematic review of the evidence for psychosocial interventions for BPSD, focusing on papers published between 2000 and 2012. All care home and nursing home studies including individual and cluster randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and pre-/post-test studies with control conditions were included. Results: 641 studies were identified, of which 40 fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was good evidence to support the value of personalized pleasant activities with and without social interaction for the treatment of agitation, and reminiscence therapy to improve mood. The evidence for other therapies was more limited. Conclusions: There is a growing body of evidence indicating specific effects of different personalized psychosocial interventions on individual BPSD and mood outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
Germany 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 157 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 44 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 18%
Researcher 21 13%
Student > Master 19 12%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Other 32 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 49 30%
Psychology 33 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 13%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Other 15 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,549,930
of 12,833,361 outputs
Outputs from International Psychogeriatrics
#204
of 1,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,577
of 190,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Psychogeriatrics
#2
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,833,361 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,568 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,732 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.