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Evaluation of blood and muscle tissues for molecular detection and characterization of hematozoa infections in northern pintails (Anas acuta) wintering in California

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, December 2013
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Title
Evaluation of blood and muscle tissues for molecular detection and characterization of hematozoa infections in northern pintails (Anas acuta) wintering in California
Published in
International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, December 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2013.02.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew M. Ramey, Joseph P. Fleskes, Joel A. Schmutz, Michael J. Yabsley

Abstract

Information on the molecular detection of hematozoa from different tissue types and multiple years would be useful to inform sample collection efforts and interpret results of meta-analyses or investigations spanning multiple seasons. In this study, we tested blood and muscle tissue collected from northern pintails (Anas acuta) during autumn and winter of different years to evaluate prevalence and genetic diversity of Leucocytozoon, Haemoproteus, and Plasmodium infections in this abundant waterfowl species of the Central Valley of California. We first compared results for paired blood and wing muscle samples to assess the utility of different tissue types for molecular investigations of haemosporidian parasites. Second, we explored inter-annual variability of hematozoa infection in Central Valley northern pintails and investigated possible effects of age, sex, and sub-region of sample collection on estimated parasite detection probability and prevalence. We found limited evidence for differences between tissue types in detection probability and prevalence of Leucocytozoon, Haemoproteus, and Plasmodium parasites, which supports the utility of both sample types for obtaining information on hematozoan infections. However, we detected 11 haemosporidian mtDNA cyt b haplotypes in blood samples vs. six in wing muscle tissue collected during the same sample year suggesting an advantage to using blood samples for investigations of genetic diversity. Estimated prevalence of Leucocytozoon parasites was greater during 2006-2007 as compared to 2011-2012 and four unique haemosporidian mtDNA cyt b haplotypes were detected in the former sample year but not in the latter. Seven of 15 mtDNA cyt b haplotypes detected in northern pintails had 100% identity with previously reported hematozoa lineages detected in waterfowl (Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon) or other avian taxa (Plasmodium) providing support for lack of host specificity for some parasite lineages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Lithuania 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 61 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Master 9 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 48%
Environmental Science 10 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2014.
All research outputs
#7,556,408
of 12,091,475 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
#180
of 250 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,099
of 199,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,475 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 250 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,440 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.