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A Comparison of Online Versus Workbook Delivery of a Self-Help Positive Parenting Program

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Primary Prevention, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 290)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
139 Mendeley
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Title
A Comparison of Online Versus Workbook Delivery of a Self-Help Positive Parenting Program
Published in
Journal of Primary Prevention, February 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10935-014-0339-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew R. Sanders, Cassandra K. Dittman, Susan P. Farruggia, Louise J. Keown

Abstract

A noninferiority randomized trial design compared the efficacy of two self-help variants of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program: an online version and a self-help workbook. We randomly assigned families of 193 children displaying early onset disruptive behavior difficulties to the online (N = 97) or workbook (N = 96) interventions. Parents completed questionnaire measures of child behavior, parenting, child maltreatment risk, personal adjustment and relationship quality at pre- and post-intervention and again at 6-month follow up. The short-term intervention effects of the Triple P Online program were not inferior to the workbook on the primary outcomes of disruptive child behavior and dysfunctional parenting as reported by both mothers and fathers. Both interventions were associated with significant and clinically meaningful declines from pre- to post-intervention in levels of disruptive child behavior, dysfunctional parenting styles, risk of child maltreatment, and inter-parental conflict on both mother and father report measures. Intervention effects were largely maintained at 6-month follow up, thus supporting the use of self-help parenting programs within a comprehensive population-based system of parenting support to reduce child maltreatment and behavioral problems in children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 135 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 19%
Researcher 21 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 13%
Unspecified 9 6%
Other 34 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 60 43%
Social Sciences 27 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 15%
Unspecified 14 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 4%
Other 11 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2018.
All research outputs
#1,483,974
of 11,707,803 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Primary Prevention
#39
of 290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,708
of 188,389 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Primary Prevention
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,707,803 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 290 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,389 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them