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Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
172 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
386 Mendeley
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Title
Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, November 2013
DOI 10.2471/blt.13.118729
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Campbell, James Buchan, Giorgio Cometto, Benedict David, Gilles Dussault, Helga Fogstad, Inês Fronteira, Rafael Lozano, Frank Nyonator, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Estelle E Quain, Ann Starrs, Viroj Tangcharoensathien

Abstract

Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) involves distributing resources, especially human resources for health (HRH), to match population needs. This paper explores the policy lessons on HRH from four countries that have achieved sustained improvements in UHC: Brazil, Ghana, Mexico and Thailand. Its purpose is to inform global policy and financial commitments on HRH in support of UHC. The paper reports on country experiences using an analytical framework that examines effective coverage in relation to the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality (AAAQ) of HRH. The AAAQ dimensions make it possible to perform tracing analysis on HRH policy actions since 1990 in the four countries of interest in relation to national trends in workforce numbers and population mortality rates. The findings inform key principles for evidence-based decision-making on HRH in support of UHC. First, HRH are critical to the expansion of health service coverage and the package of benefits; second, HRH strategies in each of the AAAQ dimensions collectively support achievements in effective coverage; and third, success is achieved through partnerships involving health and non-health actors. Facing the unprecedented health and development challenges that affect all countries and transforming HRH evidence into policy and practice must be at the heart of UHC and the post-2015 development agenda. It is a political imperative requiring national commitment and leadership to maximize the impact of available financial and human resources, and improve healthy life expectancy, with the recognition that improvements in health care are enabled by a health workforce that is fit for purpose.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 386 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 386 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 5%
Researcher 7 2%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 2%
Student > Postgraduate 5 1%
Student > Bachelor 4 1%
Other 10 3%
Unknown 335 87%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 <1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 <1%
Other 13 3%
Unknown 337 87%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#1,238,461
of 19,862,278 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#459
of 4,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,333
of 203,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#8
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,862,278 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,144 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 203,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.