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The effects of a diet formulation with oats, soybeans, and flax on lipid profiles and uricemia in patients with AIDS and dyslipidemia

Overview of attention for article published in this source, December 2013
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Title
The effects of a diet formulation with oats, soybeans, and flax on lipid profiles and uricemia in patients with AIDS and dyslipidemia
DOI 10.1590/0037-8682-0087-2013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosangela dos Santos Ferreira, Daiane Colman Cassaro, Hamilton Domingos, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury Pontes, Priscila Hiane Aiko, Junia Elisa Carvalho de Meira

Abstract

Although the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is accompanied by an attenuation of viral load, metabolic disorders characterized by hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and lipodystrophy are often observed in patients under this treatment. Certain foods, such as oat bran, soy protein, and flaxseed, have been shown to improve a patient's lipid profile despite possible increases in uricemia. Thus, a bioactive compound was formulated using these foods to help patients with HIV/AIDS control metabolic disorders resulting from HAART.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 25%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Chemistry 2 6%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 25%