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Role of Crassicauda sp. in natural mortality of pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata: a reassessment.

Overview of attention for article published in Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, February 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Role of Crassicauda sp. in natural mortality of pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata: a reassessment.
Published in
Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, February 2014
DOI 10.3354/dao02694
Pubmed ID
Authors

Balbuena JA, Simpkin A, Juan Antonio Balbuena, Andrew Simpkin

Abstract

Evaluating the effect of parasites on population size is essential for designing management and conservation plans of wild animal populations. Although knowledge in this area is scarce in cetaceans, current evidence suggests that species of the nematode genus Crassicauda may play an important regulatory role in some populations. In the present study, a semiparametric regression technique was applied to a previously published dataset to re-examine the role of Crassicauda sp. in natural mortality of pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata. The resulting model indicated parasite-induced mortality at ages between 6.5 and 9 yr and at roughly 12 yr. The maximum mortality estimates obtained could represent 2 to 4% of natural mortality in dolphins 6 to 8 yr old. This estimate is substantially smaller than previously published values, but in contrast with previous research, our model provides clear statistical evidence for parasite-induced mortality because the bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals of the estimated mortality rates excluded the 0 value. We also evaluated, through simulations, how potential sampling biases of infected dolphins could overestimate parasite-induced mortality. Small differences in sampling selectivity between infected and uninfected animals could substantially reduce the mortality estimates. However, the simulated models also supported the notion of statistically significant mortality in juvenile dolphins. Given that dolphins older than 16 yr were poorly represented in the dataset, further research is needed to establish whether Crassicauda sp. causes meaningful mortality for population dynamics among adult individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 6%
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 50%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 24%
Environmental Science 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2014.
All research outputs
#8,083,929
of 14,051,039 outputs
Outputs from Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
#509
of 826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,983
of 191,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,051,039 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 826 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,362 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.