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The student as teacher: reflections on collaborative learning in a senior seminar.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education, April 2014
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Title
The student as teacher: reflections on collaborative learning in a senior seminar.
Published in
Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education, April 2014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurczek J, Johnson J

Abstract

A major influence on education since the 1950's has been Bloom's Taxonomy, a classification of learning objectives across multiple domains meant to educate the whole student (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001). Although it has influenced educational pedagogy in primary education, higher education remains, in antiquity, heavily lecture based; viewing the instructor as an expert who professes their vast knowledge to their students. However, when students serve as instructor, it is difficult to apply this traditional view to the college classroom. Here we discuss the development, pedagogical approach, and experience of a senior level seminar course in which the students and instructor collaboratively explored an emerging field, embodied cognition, which combines research and theory from psychology and neuroscience among other disciplines, in which neither the students nor instructor were an expert. Students provided feedback and evaluations at three time points over the course of the semester, before class started, at midterm and at the end of the semester in order to address the experience and effectiveness of a collaborative seminar experience in which the instructor assumed a role closer to an equal of the students. Student responses revealed both high levels of satisfaction and degrees of perceived learning within the course at both the midterm and final evaluation. The approach of this seminar may be beneficial when applied to other seminars or course formats as students in this course felt as though they were learning more and appreciated being a more equal partner in their own learning process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Lecturer 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Unspecified 2 13%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Environmental Science 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Other 6 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2014.
All research outputs
#3,060,444
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education
#24
of 30 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,782
of 107,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one scored the same or higher as 6 of them.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them