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Harm reduction in the USA: the research perspective and an archive to David Purchase

Overview of attention for article published in Harm Reduction Journal, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 1,140)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
49 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
78 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
101 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
260 Mendeley
Title
Harm reduction in the USA: the research perspective and an archive to David Purchase
Published in
Harm Reduction Journal, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12954-017-0178-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Don C. Des Jarlais

Abstract

The history of harm reduction in the USA has led to the development of some of the most important methods for treating persons for drug use disorders, such as methadone and buprenorphine for opiate use disorder. However, there has been fierce political resistance to implementation and scale-up of harm reduction in the USA. This resistance is rooted in historical demonization of particular psychoactive drugs that were associated with stigmatized racial/ethnic groups.With the discovery of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1981, harm reduction became important not only for treating substance use disorders, but for reducing transmission of blood-borne infection. However, within the context of the crack cocaine epidemic in the 1980s, it was very difficult to implement any programs that appeared to "condone" drug use.It was not until the late 1980s that syringe exchange programs began at the state and local level in the USA. With funding primarily from state and local governments and the support of the North American Syringe Exchange Network (NASEN), there are now approximately 200 programs for syringe exchange in the USA. Research has shown that these programs have been extremely effective in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among persons who inject drugs (PWID). The programs in the USA also offer many additional services for drug users, including condom distribution, referrals to substance abuse treatment, HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) counseling and testing, overdose education and naloxone distribution to reverse for overdose.Currently, the USA is experiencing an opioid/heroin epidemic, with significant increases in overdose deaths among drug users. Much of this epidemic is occurring in suburban and rural of the country without harm reduction services. The current challenges for harm reduction and harm reduction research involve expansion of services to suburban and rural areas and implementation science on how to effectively and efficiently address HCV transmission and overdose. Most importantly, continued research efforts are needed to reduce the stigma of psychoactive drug use. While political opposition continues, harm reduction activists and researchers have developed a highly effective partnership based on a common core values.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 78 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 260 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 260 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 16%
Student > Bachelor 36 14%
Researcher 23 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 7%
Other 22 8%
Unknown 96 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 46 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 12%
Psychology 23 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 3%
Other 27 10%
Unknown 105 40%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 451. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2024.
All research outputs
#62,487
of 25,724,500 outputs
Outputs from Harm Reduction Journal
#8
of 1,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,297
of 327,962 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Harm Reduction Journal
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,724,500 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,140 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 327,962 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.