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Dietary calcium does not interact with vitamin D3 in terms of determining the response and catabolism of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D during winter in older adults

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary calcium does not interact with vitamin D3 in terms of determining the response and catabolism of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D during winter in older adults
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2014
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.113.080358
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin D Cashman, Aoife Hayes, Sinead M O’Donovan, Joy Y Zhang, Michael Kinsella, Karen Galvin, Mairead Kiely, Kelly M Seamans

Abstract

Interactions between calcium and vitamin D may have implications for the regulation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and its catabolism and, consequently, the vitamin D dietary requirement.OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether different calcium intakes influenced serum 25(OH)D and indexes of vitamin D activation and catabolism during winter and in the context of both adequate and inadequate vitamin D intakes.DESIGN: A 15-wk winter-based, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind vitamin D3 intervention (20 μg/d) study was carried out in free-living men and women aged ≥50 y (n = 125) who were stratified according to calcium intakes [moderate-low (<700 mg/d) or high (>1000 mg/d) intake]. The serum 25(OH)D concentration was the primary outcome, and serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [24,25(OH)2D], the ratio of 24,25(OH)2D to 25(OH)D, vitamin D-binding protein, and free 25(OH)D were exploratory outcomes.RESULTS: A repeated-measures ANOVA showed there was no significant (P = 0.2) time × vitamin D treatment × calcium intake grouping interaction effect on the mean serum 25(OH)D concentration over the 15-wk intervention period. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased (P ≤ 0.005) and decreased (P ≤ 0.002) in vitamin D3 and placebo groups, respectively, and were of similar magnitudes in subjects with calcium intakes <700 mg/d (and even <550 mg/d) compared with >1000 mg/d. The response of serum PTH, 1,25(OH)2D, 24,25(OH)2D, the ratio of 24,25(OH)2D to 25(OH)D, and free 25(OH)D significantly differed in vitamin D3 and placebo groups but not by calcium intake grouping.Conclusions: We found no evidence of a vitamin D sparing effect of high calcium intake, which has been referred to by some authors as "vitamin D economy." Thus, recent dietary vitamin D requirement estimates will cover the vitamin D needs of even those individuals who have inadequate calcium intakes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01990872.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Master 7 10%
Other 7 10%
Other 18 25%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Sports and Recreations 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 10 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2015.
All research outputs
#5,106,097
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#5,967
of 11,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,730
of 198,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#73
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.8. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,758 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.