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Disability and progression in Afro-descendant patients with multiple sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, October 2016
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Title
Disability and progression in Afro-descendant patients with multiple sclerosis
Published in
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, October 2016
DOI 10.1590/0004-282x20160118
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliana Calvet Kallenbach Aurenção, Claudia Cristina Ferreira Vasconcelos, Luiz Claudio Santos Thuler, Regina Maria Papais Alvarenga

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence is higher in Caucasian (CA) populations, narrowing the analysis of the impact of Afro-descendant (AD) populations in disease outcomes. Even so, recent studies observed that AD patients have a more severe course. The main objective of this study is to confirm and discuss, through a systematic review, that being AD is a risk factor for disability accumulation and/or severe progression in patients with MS. A systematic review of published data in the last eleven years was performed, which evaluated clinical aspects and long term disability in patients with MS. Fourteen studies were included. Of these fourteen articles, thirteen observed a relationship between ancestry and poorer outcome of MS. African ancestry is a condition inherent in the patient and should be considered as an initial clinical characteristic affecting prognosis, and influencing which therapeutic decision to make in initial phases.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 20%
Other 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Neuroscience 4 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 28%