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Adapting acceptance and commitment therapy for parents of children with life-threatening illness: Pilot study.

Overview of attention for article published in Families, Systems & Health: The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 165)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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140 Mendeley
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Title
Adapting acceptance and commitment therapy for parents of children with life-threatening illness: Pilot study.
Published in
Families, Systems & Health: The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare, January 2014
DOI 10.1037/fsh0000012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Burke K, Muscara F, McCarthy M, Dimovski A, Hearps S, Anderson V, Walser R, Kylie Burke, Frank Muscara, Maria McCarthy, Anica Dimovski, Stephen Hearps, Vicki Anderson, Robyn Walser

Abstract

We piloted a novel parent-targeted intervention, Take A Breath (TAB), for parents of children diagnosed with a life-threatening illness (LTI) with the aim of reducing parental distress. Parents were assisted to adapt to their child's diagnosis, treatment, and recovery via TAB's combined acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and problem-solving skills training (PSST) approach. Participants were 11 parents of children with a diagnosis of cancer, or who had life-saving cardiac surgery at least 4 months prior. Parents completed questionnaires at pre, post, and 6-month follow-up assessing parent posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), the emotional impact of the child's LTI (e.g., feelings of uncertainty, guilt and sorrow, emotional resources), and psychological elements targeted by the intervention (parental psychological flexibility and mindfulness). Parents reported significant reductions in PTSS and emotional impact from their child's LTI, along with significant improvements in parental psychological flexibility and mindfulness. Effect sizes were medium to large, and improvements were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Our pilot indicates the TAB intervention has promise for preventing or reducing parental distress associated with child LTI and warrants more rigorous evaluation. Although preliminary, these findings suggest that targeting parents' subjective perceptions of their child's LTI may be an effective approach to reducing parental distress. Our results also indicate the potential for such an approach to be adopted across diverse child diagnoses in the acute pediatric setting. Further, our findings provide early indications that ACT combined with PSST is an appropriate therapeutic approach within this context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 136 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Unspecified 17 12%
Researcher 12 9%
Other 41 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 71 51%
Unspecified 27 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 9%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Other 10 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,666,101
of 11,586,463 outputs
Outputs from Families, Systems & Health: The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare
#21
of 165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,881
of 186,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Families, Systems & Health: The Journal of Collaborative Family HealthCare
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,586,463 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them