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Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2009
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Mentioned by

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6 Facebook pages

Citations

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80 Dimensions

Readers on

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136 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-10-s1-s1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alfredo Avellaneda Fernández, Alberto Isla Guerrero, Maravillas Izquierdo Martínez, María Eugenia Amado Vázquez, Javier Barrón Fernández, Ester Chesa i Octavio, Javier De la Cruz Labrado, Mercedes Escribano Silva, Marta Fernández de Gamboa Fernández de Araoz, Rocío García-Ramos, Miguel García Ribes, Carmen Gómez, Joaquín Insausti Valdivia, Ramón Navarro Valbuena, José R Ramón

Abstract

Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neuropathic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarily based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Japan 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 130 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 19 14%
Other 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Student > Master 14 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Other 43 32%
Unknown 11 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 57%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Neuroscience 6 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Psychology 3 2%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 15 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2017.
All research outputs
#7,141,915
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,292
of 2,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,725
of 86,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#13
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,454 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 86,250 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.