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Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
295 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
620 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2011
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1103097108
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. J. Wenger, D. J. Isaak, C. H. Luce, H. M. Neville, K. D. Fausch, J. B. Dunham, D. C. Dauwalter, M. K. Young, M. M. Elsner, B. E. Rieman, A. F. Hamlet, J. E. Williams

Abstract

Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout across the interior western United States (1.01 million km(2)), based on empirical statistical models built from fish surveys at 9,890 sites. Projections under the 2080s A1B emissions scenario forecast a mean 47% decline in total suitable habitat for all trout, a group of fishes of major socioeconomic and ecological significance. We project that native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, already excluded from much of its potential range by nonnative species, will lose a further 58% of habitat due to an increase in temperatures beyond the species' physiological optima and continued negative biotic interactions. Habitat for nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta is predicted to decline by 77% and 48%, respectively, driven by increases in temperature and winter flood frequency caused by warmer, rainier winters. Habitat for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is projected to decline the least (35%) because negative temperature effects are partly offset by flow regime shifts that benefit the species. These results illustrate how drivers other than temperature influence species response to climate change. Despite some uncertainty, large declines in trout habitat are likely, but our findings point to opportunities for strategic targeting of mitigation efforts to appropriate stressors and locations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 620 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 31 5%
Canada 8 1%
Germany 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Ukraine 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 563 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 165 27%
Student > Master 126 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 120 19%
Student > Bachelor 51 8%
Other 42 7%
Other 82 13%
Unknown 34 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 266 43%
Environmental Science 222 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 27 4%
Engineering 20 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 2%
Other 14 2%
Unknown 61 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2019.
All research outputs
#445,874
of 14,540,762 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#8,853
of 82,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,240
of 88,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#59
of 869 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,540,762 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 88,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 869 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.