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Worry in Head and Neck Cancer Caregivers

Overview of attention for article published in Nursing Research (New York), July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Worry in Head and Neck Cancer Caregivers
Published in
Nursing Research (New York), July 2017
DOI 10.1097/nnr.0000000000000223
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Maguire, Paul Hanly, Myles Balfe, Aileen Timmons, Philip Hyland, Eleanor O’Sullivan, Phyllis Butow, Linda Sharp

Abstract

Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a primary concern for both cancer survivors and their caregivers, yet little is known about what care-related factors exacerbate this worry. This study aimed to establish the role of care-related stressors-as distinct from survivor characteristics-in predicting FOR in head and neck cancer caregivers. HNC survivor-caregiver dyads took part in a mailed survey. Survivors provided information on health and quality of life (using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Questionnaire). Caregivers provided sociodemographic information, impact of caring on their time and finances, as well as their level of social support (Oslo Support Scale), loneliness (3-point loneliness scale), and completed the Worry of Cancer Scale (to measure FOR). Data from 180 dyads were available for analysis. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the role of caregiver stressors, social support, and loneliness while controlling for caregiver and survivor characteristics. The model explained 28% of the variance in Worry of Cancer scores (FOR). Caregivers who reported more loneliness, spent more time caring, and had greater financial stress from caring had higher scores on Worry of Cancer (FOR). Female caregivers, those caring for younger survivors, and those with survivors who had undergone less extensive forms of surgery also reported higher FOR. A combination of factors place caregivers at greater risk of cancer-related worry, paving the way for designing interventions aimed at reducing FOR in caregivers of patients with head and neck cancers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 6%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 24 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 22%
Psychology 14 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 9%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 23 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,436,464
of 17,819,859 outputs
Outputs from Nursing Research (New York)
#68
of 1,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,494
of 278,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nursing Research (New York)
#4
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,819,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,087 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.