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Estimating Abundances of Interacting Species Using Morphological Traits, Foraging Guilds, and Habitat

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, April 2014
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Title
Estimating Abundances of Interacting Species Using Morphological Traits, Foraging Guilds, and Habitat
Published in
PLoS ONE, April 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0094323
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert M. Dorazio, Edward F. Connor

Abstract

We developed a statistical model to estimate the abundances of potentially interacting species encountered while conducting point-count surveys at a set of ecologically relevant locations - as in a metacommunity of species. In the model we assume that abundances of species with similar traits (e.g., body size) are potentially correlated and that these correlations, when present, may exist among all species or only among functionally related species (such as members of the same foraging guild). We also assume that species-specific abundances vary among locations owing to systematic and stochastic sources of heterogeneity. For example, if abundances differ among locations due to differences in habitat, then measures of habitat may be included in the model as covariates. Naturally, the quantitative effects of these covariates are assumed to differ among species. Our model also accounts for the effects of detectability on the observed counts of each species. This aspect of the model is especially important for rare or uncommon species that may be difficult to detect in community-level surveys. Estimating the detectability of each species requires sampling locations to be surveyed repeatedly using different observers or different visits of a single observer. As an illustration, we fitted models to species-specific counts of birds obtained while sampling an avian community during the breeding season. In the analysis we examined whether species abundances appeared to be correlated due to similarities in morphological measures (body mass, beak length, tarsus length, wing length, tail length) and whether these correlations existed among all species or only among species of the same foraging guild. We also used the model to estimate the effects of forested area on species abundances and the effects of sound power output (as measured by body size) on species detection probabilities.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 9%
Brazil 5 6%
Spain 2 2%
Germany 2 2%
Italy 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 67 76%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 25%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 7 8%
Other 17 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 62 70%
Environmental Science 21 24%
Unspecified 5 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2014.
All research outputs
#9,669,561
of 12,091,627 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#98,745
of 133,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,578
of 199,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,281
of 4,314 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,030 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 4,314 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.