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Adolescent Risperidone treatment alters protein expression associated with protein trafficking and cellular metabolism in the adult rat prefrontal cortex

Overview of attention for article published in PROTEOMICS, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Adolescent Risperidone treatment alters protein expression associated with protein trafficking and cellular metabolism in the adult rat prefrontal cortex
Published in
PROTEOMICS, May 2014
DOI 10.1002/pmic.201300466
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lorna A. Farrelly, Patrick Dicker, Kieran Wynne, Jane English, Gerard Cagney, Melanie Föcking, David R. Cotter

Abstract

The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with mental health illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. It richly expresses neuroreceptors which are the target for antipsychotics. However, as the precise mechanism of action of antipsychotic medications is not known, proteomic studies of the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the brain are warranted. In the current study, we aimed to characterize protein expression in the adult rodent PFC (n = 5 per group) following low-dose treatment with Risperidone or saline in adolescence (postnatal days 34-47). The PFC was examined by triplicate 1 h runs of label-free LC-MS/MS. The raw mass spectral data were analyzed with the MaxQuant(TM) software. Statistical analysis was carried out using SAS® Version 9.1. Pathway and functional analysis was performed with IngenuityPathway Analysis and in the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID), respectively, the most implicated pathways were found to be related to mitochondrial function, protein trafficking, and the cytoskeleton. This report adds to the current repertoire of data available concerning the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the brain and sheds light on their biological mechanisms. The MS data have been deposited with the ProteomeXchange Consortium with dataset identifier PXD000480.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 58 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 6 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 12%
Neuroscience 6 10%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2014.
All research outputs
#8,963,312
of 15,881,336 outputs
Outputs from PROTEOMICS
#1,851
of 3,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,158
of 193,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PROTEOMICS
#16
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,881,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,454 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,289 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.