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Estimating migratory connectivity of birds when re‐encounter probabilities are heterogeneous

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, April 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

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8 tweeters

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Title
Estimating migratory connectivity of birds when re‐encounter probabilities are heterogeneous
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, April 2014
DOI 10.1002/ece3.1059
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cohen EB, Hostetler JA, Royle JA, Marra PP, Cohen, Emily B., Hostetler, Jeffrey A., Royle, J. Andrew, Marra, Peter P., Emily B. Cohen, Jeffrey A. Hostetler, J. Andrew Royle, Peter P. Marra

Abstract

Understanding the biology and conducting effective conservation of migratory species requires an understanding of migratory connectivity - the geographic linkages of populations between stages of the annual cycle. Unfortunately, for most species, we are lacking such information. The North American Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) houses an extensive database of marking, recaptures and recoveries, and such data could provide migratory connectivity information for many species. To date, however, few species have been analyzed for migratory connectivity largely because heterogeneous re-encounter probabilities make interpretation problematic. We accounted for regional variation in re-encounter probabilities by borrowing information across species and by using effort covariates on recapture and recovery probabilities in a multistate capture-recapture and recovery model. The effort covariates were derived from recaptures and recoveries of species within the same regions. We estimated the migratory connectivity for three tern species breeding in North America and over-wintering in the tropics, common (Sterna hirundo), roseate (Sterna dougallii), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia). For western breeding terns, model-derived estimates of migratory connectivity differed considerably from those derived directly from the proportions of re-encounters. Conversely, for eastern breeding terns, estimates were merely refined by the inclusion of re-encounter probabilities. In general, eastern breeding terns were strongly connected to eastern South America, and western breeding terns were strongly linked to the more western parts of the nonbreeding range under both models. Through simulation, we found this approach is likely useful for many species in the BBL database, although precision improved with higher re-encounter probabilities and stronger migratory connectivity. We describe an approach to deal with the inherent biases in BBL banding and re-encounter data to demonstrate that this large dataset is a valuable source of information about the migratory connectivity of the birds of North America.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Japan 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 55 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 25%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 72%
Environmental Science 8 13%
Unspecified 3 5%
Computer Science 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,940,265
of 12,172,179 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#1,308
of 3,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,653
of 197,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#22
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,172,179 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,243 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.