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Female Penis, Male Vagina, and Their Correlated Evolution in a Cave Insect

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 7,025)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
75 news outlets
blogs
27 blogs
twitter
1881 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
156 Mendeley
Title
Female Penis, Male Vagina, and Their Correlated Evolution in a Cave Insect
Published in
Current Biology, April 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.022
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshizawa K, Ferreira RL, Kamimura Y, Lienhard C, Kazunori Yoshizawa, Rodrigo L. Ferreira, Yoshitaka Kamimura, Charles Lienhard, Rodrigo L. Ferreira

Abstract

Sex-specific elaborations are common in animals and have attracted the attention of many biologists, including Darwin [1]. It is accepted that sexual selection promotes the evolution of sex-specific elaborations. Due to the faster replenishment rate of gametes, males generally have higher potential reproductive and optimal mating rates than females. Therefore, sexual selection acts strongly on males [2], leading to the rapid evolution and diversification of male genitalia [3]. Male genitalia are sometimes used as devices for coercive holding of females as a result of sexual conflict over mating [4, 5]. In contrast, female genitalia are usually simple. Here we report the reversal of intromittent organs in the insect genus Neotrogla (Psocodea: Prionoglarididae) from Brazilian caves. Females have a highly elaborate, penis-like structure, the gynosome, while males lack an intromittent organ. The gynosome has species-specific elaborations, such as numerous spines that fit species-specific pouches in the simple male genital chamber. During prolonged copulation (~40-70 hr), a large and potentially nutritious ejaculate is transferred from the male via the gynosome. The correlated genital evolution in Neotrogla is probably driven by reversed sexual selection with females competing for seminal gifts. Nothing similar is known among sex-role reversed animals.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 156 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 8 5%
United States 6 4%
France 2 1%
Czech Republic 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
Russian Federation 2 1%
Portugal 2 1%
Switzerland 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Other 9 6%
Unknown 119 76%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 22%
Student > Bachelor 24 15%
Student > Master 24 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 30 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 123 79%
Unspecified 7 4%
Environmental Science 5 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Other 15 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1915. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2017.
All research outputs
#369
of 8,417,951 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#8
of 7,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4
of 178,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,417,951 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,025 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,866 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.