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Imaging spectroscopy links aspen genotype with below-ground processes at landscape scales

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
Title
Imaging spectroscopy links aspen genotype with below-ground processes at landscape scales
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2014
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2013.0194
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael D. Madritch, Clayton C. Kingdon, Aditya Singh, Karen E. Mock, Richard L. Lindroth, Philip A. Townsend

Abstract

Fine-scale biodiversity is increasingly recognized as important to ecosystem-level processes. Remote sensing technologies have great potential to estimate both biodiversity and ecosystem function over large spatial scales. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of imaging spectroscopy to discriminate among genotypes of Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen), one of the most genetically diverse and widespread forest species in North America. We combine imaging spectroscopy (AVIRIS) data with genetic, phytochemical, microbial and biogeochemical data to determine how intraspecific plant genetic variation influences below-ground processes at landscape scales. We demonstrate that both canopy chemistry and below-ground processes vary over large spatial scales (continental) according to aspen genotype. Imaging spectrometer data distinguish aspen genotypes through variation in canopy spectral signature. In addition, foliar spectral variation correlates well with variation in canopy chemistry, especially condensed tannins. Variation in aspen canopy chemistry, in turn, is correlated with variation in below-ground processes. Variation in spectra also correlates well with variation in soil traits. These findings indicate that forest tree species can create spatial mosaics of ecosystem functioning across large spatial scales and that these patterns can be quantified via remote sensing techniques. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of using optical properties as proxies for fine-scale measurements of biodiversity over large spatial scales.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 6%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 117 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 18%
Student > Master 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 22 17%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 33%
Environmental Science 34 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 18 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Sports and Recreations 2 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 21 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2019.
All research outputs
#826,175
of 15,411,033 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#795
of 5,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,837
of 191,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#8
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,411,033 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.