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Acute changes in blood lipid profiles and metabolic risk factors in collegiate elite taekwondo athletes after short-term de-training: a prospective insight for athletic health management

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Acute changes in blood lipid profiles and metabolic risk factors in collegiate elite taekwondo athletes after short-term de-training: a prospective insight for athletic health management
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12944-017-0534-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Chi Sung, Yi-Hung Liao, Chung-Yu Chen, Yu-Liang Chen, Chun-Chung Chou

Abstract

This study used a short-term de-training model to mimic the physiological weight changes during the early retirement stage in Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. This study investigates whether the negative changes in body composition, blood lipid profiles, and metabolic biomarkers occur in elite collegiate TKD athletes when experiencing a two-months de-training period. Fourteen collegiate Division Ι elite TKD athletes (age: 21.1 ± 0.2 years, BMI: 22.3 ± 1.1 kg/m(2); 10 males and 4 females) participated in this study. The body composition, blood lipid profiles, atherogenic dyslipidemia indexes, metabolic biomarkers and baseline systemic inflammation states were measured before and after two-months de-training. The body weight and BMI did not change after de-training in these elite TKD athletes. The total muscle mass displayed a significant decline after de-training (-2.0%, p = 0.019), with an increase in fat mass (+24.3%, p < 0.01). The blood triglyceride did not change, but the total cholesterol was higher after de-training (+8.3%, p = 0.047). The CHOL-to-HDL and LDL-to-HDL ratios increased by 12.4% (p < 0.001) and 13.2% (p = 0.002) after de-training, respectively. The blood platelet number, plateletcrit, and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio increased significantly by 5.0% (p = 0.013), 7.3% (p = 0.009), and 20.6% (p = 0.018) after de-training, respectively. The McAuley's Index decreased (-6.9%, p = 0.025) after de-training. We demonstrated that a two-months de-training period resulted in adverse effects on early atherogenic dyslipidemia development, progressing insulin resistance, low-grade inflammation, and visceral adiposity in young elite TKD athletes. Our findings provide clear insights into the possible deleterious impacts at early stage retirement in former combative sports athletes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 11 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 17 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Arts and Humanities 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,303,256
of 12,114,099 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#516
of 851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,669
of 267,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,114,099 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,572 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them