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Population structure of guppies in north-eastern Venezuela, the area of putative incipient speciation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Population structure of guppies in north-eastern Venezuela, the area of putative incipient speciation
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-14-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Magdalena Herdegen, Heather J Alexander, Wiesław Babik, Jesús Mavárez, Felix Breden, Jacek Radwan

Abstract

Geographic barriers to gene flow and divergence among populations in sexual traits are two important causes of genetic isolation which may lead to speciation. Genetic isolation may be facilitated if these two mechanisms act synergistically. The guppy from the Cumaná region (within the Cariaco drainage) of eastern Venezuela has been previously described as a case of incipient speciation driven by sexual selection, significantly differentiated in sexual colouration and body shape from the common guppy, Poecilia reticulata. The latter occurs widely in northern Venezuela, including the south-eastern side of Cordillera de la Costa, where it inhabits streams belonging to the San Juan drainage. Here, we present molecular and morphological analyses of differentiation among guppy populations in the Cariaco and San Juan drainages. Our analyses are based on a 953 bp long mtDNA fragment, a set of 15 microsatellites (519 fish from 20 populations), and four phenotypic traits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Poland 1 3%
Serbia 1 3%
Japan 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 23 79%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Professor 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 90%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,875,350
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#706
of 2,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,332
of 193,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#7
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,341 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.