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Reduced nephron number and glomerulomegaly in Australian Aborigines: a group at high risk for renal disease and hypertension.

Overview of attention for article published in Kidney International, July 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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25 Facebook pages
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Readers on

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37 Mendeley
Title
Reduced nephron number and glomerulomegaly in Australian Aborigines: a group at high risk for renal disease and hypertension.
Published in
Kidney International, July 2006
DOI 10.1038/sj.ki.5000397
Pubmed ID
Authors

W.E. Hoy, M.D. Hughson, G.R. Singh, R. Douglas-Denton, J.F. Bertram

Abstract

Aborigines in remote areas of Australia have much higher rates of renal disease, as well as hypertension and cardiovascular disease, than non-Aboriginal Australians. We compared kidney findings in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in one remote region. Glomerular number and mean glomerular volume were estimated with the disector/fractionator combination in the right kidney of 19 Aborigines and 24 non-Aboriginal people undergoing forensic autopsy for sudden or unexpected death in the Top End of the Northern Territory. Aborigines had 30% fewer glomeruli than non-Aborigines--202,000 fewer glomeruli per kidney, or an estimated 404,000 fewer per person (P=0.036). Their mean glomerular volume was 27% larger (P=0.016). Glomerular number was significantly correlated with adult height, inferring a relationship with birthweight, which, on average, is much lower in Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal people. Aboriginal people with a history of hypertension had 30% fewer glomeruli than those without--250,000 fewer per kidney (P=0.03), or 500,000 fewer per person, and their mean glomerular volume was about 25% larger. The lower nephron number in Aboriginal people is compatible with their susceptibility to renal failure. The additional nephron deficit associated with hypertension is compatible with other reports. Lower nephron numbers are probably due in part to reduced nephron endowment, which is related to a suboptimal intrauterine environment. Compensatory glomerular hypertrophy in people with fewer nephrons, while minimizing loss of total filtering surface area, might be exacerbating nephron loss. Optimization of fetal growth should ultimately reduce the florid epidemic of renal disease, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
Australia 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 14%
Other 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 59%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 24%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,074,845
of 8,041,560 outputs
Outputs from Kidney International
#360
of 2,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,351
of 67,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Kidney International
#2
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,041,560 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,511 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 67,582 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.