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Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
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Title
Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams
Published in
Global Change Biology, May 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12614
Pubmed ID
Authors

John T. Crawford, Emily H. Stanley, Seth A. Spawn, Jacques C. Finlay, Luke C. Loken, Robert G. Striegl

Abstract

Stream and river carbon dioxide emissions are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emissions from streams could also contribute to regional or global greenhouse gas cycling, but there are relatively few data regarding stream and river methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble-mediated) pathway, instead focusing on emission of dissolved methane by diffusion or convection. Here, we show the importance of ebullitive methane emissions from small streams in the regional greenhouse gas balance of a lake and wetland-dominated landscape in temperate North America and identify the origin of the methane emitted from these well-oxygenated streams. Stream methane flux densities from this landscape tended to exceed those of nearby wetland diffusive fluxes as well as average global wetland ebullitive fluxes. Total stream ebullitive methane flux at the regional scale (103 Mg C yr(-1) ; over 6400 km(2) ) was of the same magnitude as diffusive methane flux previously documented at the same scale. Organic-rich stream sediments had the highest rates of bubble release and higher enrichment of methane in bubbles, but glacial sand sediments also exhibited high bubble emissions relative to other studied environments. Our results from a database of groundwater chemistry support the hypothesis that methane in bubbles is produced in anoxic near-stream sediment porewaters, and not in deeper, oxygenated groundwaters. Methane interacts with other key elemental cycles such as nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, which has implications for ecosystem changes such as drought and increased nutrient loading. Our results support the contention that streams, particularly those draining wetland landscapes of the northern hemisphere, are an important component of the global methane cycle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 4%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 105 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 25%
Researcher 19 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Unspecified 7 6%
Other 21 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 56 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 16 14%
Unspecified 11 10%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 5 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2014.
All research outputs
#411,148
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#475
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,230
of 196,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#21
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,797 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.