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Geographic population structure analysis of worldwide human populations infers their biogeographical origins

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
29 news outlets
blogs
13 blogs
twitter
70 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
95 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
355 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
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Title
Geographic population structure analysis of worldwide human populations infers their biogeographical origins
Published in
Nature Communications, April 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4513
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eran Elhaik, Tatiana Tatarinova, Dmitri Chebotarev, Ignazio S. Piras, Carla Maria Calò, Antonella De Montis, Manuela Atzori, Monica Marini, Sergio Tofanelli, Paolo Francalacci, Luca Pagani, Chris Tyler-Smith, Yali Xue, Francesco Cucca, Theodore G. Schurr, Jill B. Gaieski, Carlalynne Melendez, Miguel G. Vilar, Amanda C. Owings, Rocío Gómez, Ricardo Fujita, Fabrício R. Santos, David Comas, Oleg Balanovsky, Elena Balanovska, Pierre Zalloua, Himla Soodyall, Ramasamy Pitchappan, ArunKumar GaneshPrasad, Michael Hammer, Lisa Matisoo-Smith, R. Spencer Wells

Abstract

The search for a method that utilizes biological information to predict humans' place of origin has occupied scientists for millennia. Over the past four decades, scientists have employed genetic data in an effort to achieve this goal but with limited success. While biogeographical algorithms using next-generation sequencing data have achieved an accuracy of 700 km in Europe, they were inaccurate elsewhere. Here we describe the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) algorithm and demonstrate its accuracy with three data sets using 40,000-130,000 SNPs. GPS placed 83% of worldwide individuals in their country of origin. Applied to over 200 Sardinians villagers, GPS placed a quarter of them in their villages and most of the rest within 50 km of their villages. GPS's accuracy and power to infer the biogeography of worldwide individuals down to their country or, in some cases, village, of origin, underscores the promise of admixture-based methods for biogeography and has ramifications for genetic ancestry testing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 70 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 355 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 3%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Germany 3 <1%
Philippines 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 325 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 90 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 72 20%
Student > Master 42 12%
Student > Bachelor 30 8%
Other 21 6%
Other 70 20%
Unknown 30 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 156 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 66 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 5%
Computer Science 12 3%
Social Sciences 12 3%
Other 50 14%
Unknown 43 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 381. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2020.
All research outputs
#46,686
of 18,330,451 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#656
of 36,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#437
of 198,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#5
of 188 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,330,451 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 36,446 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 53.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 188 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.