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Use of Evidence-Based Interventions in Acute Coronary Syndrome - Subanalysis of the ACCEPT Registry

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia, January 2014
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Title
Use of Evidence-Based Interventions in Acute Coronary Syndrome - Subanalysis of the ACCEPT Registry
Published in
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia, January 2014
DOI 10.5935/abc.20140033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ricardo Wang, Fernando Carvalho Neuenschwander, Augusto Lima Filho, Celsa Maria Moreira, Elizabete Silva dos Santos, Helder Jose Lima Reis, Edson Renato Romano, Luiz Alberto Piva e Mattos, Otávio Berwanger, Jadelson Pinheiro de Andrade

Abstract

Background: The recommendations in guidelines are based on evidence; however, there is a gap between recommendations and clinical practice. Objective: To describe the practice of prescribing evidence-based treatments for patients with acute coronary syndrome in Brazil. Methods: This study carried out a subanalysis of the ACCEPT registry, assessing epidemiological data and the prescription rate of acetylsalicylic acid, p2y12 inhibitors, antithrombotic drugs, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers (IAT1RB), and statins. In addition, the quality of myocardial reperfusion in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was evaluated. Results: This study assessed 2,453 patients. The prescription rates of acetylsalicylic acid, p2y12 inhibitors, antithrombotic drugs, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/IAT1RB, and statins were as follows: in 24 hours - 97.6%, 89.5%, 89.1%, 80.2%, 67.9% and 90.6%; and at six months - 89.3%, 53.6%, 0%, 74.4%, 57.6% and 85.4%, respectively. Regarding ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, only 35.9% and 25.3% of the patients underwent primary angioplasty and thrombolysis, respectively, within the recommended times. Conclusion: This registry showed high initial prescription rates of antiplatelet drugs, antithrombotic drugs, and statins, and lower prescription rates of beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/IAT1RB. Independently of the class, the use of all drugs decreased by six months. Most patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction did not undergo myocardial reperfusion within the time recommended.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Unspecified 1 5%
Researcher 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 11 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Unspecified 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 11 50%