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Mechanisms Underlying Alcohol-Approach Action Tendencies: The Role of Emotional Primes and Drinking Motives

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychiatry, April 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

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Title
Mechanisms Underlying Alcohol-Approach Action Tendencies: The Role of Emotional Primes and Drinking Motives
Published in
Frontiers in Psychiatry, April 2014
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2014.00044
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cousijn, Janna, Luijten, Maartje, Wiers, Reinout, Wiers, Reinout W.

Abstract

The tendency to approach alcohol-related stimuli is known as the alcohol-approach bias and has been related to heavy alcohol use. It is currently unknown whether the alcohol-approach bias is more pronounced after emotional priming. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether positive and negative emotional primes would modulate the alcohol-approach bias. For this purpose, a new contextual emotional prime-approach avoidance task was developed, containing both negative and positive emotional primes. Explicit coping drinking motives were expected to be related to an increased alcohol-approach bias after negative primes. Results of 65 heavy and 50 occasional drinkers showed that the alcohol-approach bias was increased in both groups during negative emotional priming. This appeared to be due to slower alcohol avoidance rather than faster alcohol approach. This change in alcohol-approach bias was positively related to explicit enhancement drinking motives and negatively related to alcohol use-related problems. A stronger alcohol-approach bias in heavy compared to occasional drinkers could not be replicated here, and coping drinking motives were not related to the alcohol-approach bias in any of the emotional contexts. The current findings suggest that both occasional and heavy drinkers have a selective difficulty to avoid alcohol-related cues in a negative emotional context. Negative reinforcement may therefore be involved in different types of drinking patterns. The influence of emotional primes on alcohol-related action tendencies may become smaller when alcohol use becomes more problematic, which is in line with habit accounts of addiction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 4%
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 23 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Student > Master 5 20%
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Researcher 3 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 12%
Other 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 64%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2015.
All research outputs
#6,538,229
of 11,410,058 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychiatry
#960
of 1,555 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,430
of 186,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychiatry
#28
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,410,058 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,555 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,381 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.