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Regulation of host weight gain and lipid metabolism by bacterial bile acid modification in the gut

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
33 tweeters
patent
1 patent
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
324 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
482 Mendeley
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Title
Regulation of host weight gain and lipid metabolism by bacterial bile acid modification in the gut
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1323599111
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. A. Joyce, J. MacSharry, P. G. Casey, M. Kinsella, E. F. Murphy, F. Shanahan, C. Hill, C. G. M. Gahan

Abstract

Alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota have been implicated in obesity in mice and humans, but the key microbial functions influencing host energy metabolism and adiposity remain to be determined. Despite an increased understanding of the genetic content of the gastrointestinal microbiome, functional analyses of common microbial gene sets are required. We established a controlled expression system for the parallel functional analysis of microbial alleles in the murine gut. Using this approach we show that bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH) mediates a microbe-host dialogue that functionally regulates host lipid metabolism and plays a profound role in cholesterol metabolism and weight gain in the host. Expression of cloned BSH enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic or conventionally raised mice significantly altered plasma bile acid signatures and regulated transcription of key genes involved in lipid metabolism (Pparγ, Angptl4), cholesterol metabolism (Abcg5/8), gastrointestinal homeostasis (RegIIIγ), and circadian rhythm (Dbp, Per1/2) in the liver or small intestine. High-level expression of BSH in conventionally raised mice resulted in a significant reduction in host weight gain, plasma cholesterol, and liver triglycerides, demonstrating the overall impact of elevated BSH activity on host physiology. In addition, BSH activity in vivo varied according to BSH allele group, indicating that subtle differences in activity can have significant effects on the host. In summary, we demonstrate that bacterial BSH activity significantly impacts the systemic metabolic processes and adiposity in the host and represents a key mechanistic target for the control of obesity and hypercholesterolemia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 482 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 1%
France 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 466 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 95 20%
Researcher 82 17%
Student > Master 57 12%
Student > Bachelor 56 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 36 7%
Other 87 18%
Unknown 69 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 165 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 74 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 61 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 45 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 3%
Other 40 8%
Unknown 82 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 67. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2018.
All research outputs
#418,792
of 18,810,596 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#8,356
of 91,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,762
of 199,651 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#160
of 988 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,810,596 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,795 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,651 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 988 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.