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Application of the 2014 NICE cholesterol guidelines in the English population: a cross-sectional analysis

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 1,956)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

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25 tweeters
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9 Facebook pages
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2 CiteULike
Title
Application of the 2014 NICE cholesterol guidelines in the English population: a cross-sectional analysis
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, August 2017
DOI 10.3399/bjgp17x692141
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Ueda, Thomas Wai-Chun Lung, Philip Clarke, Goodarz Danaei

Abstract

The 2014 guidelines on cardiovascular risk assessment and lipid modification from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend statin therapy for adults with prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), and for adults with a 10-year CVD risk of ≥10%, estimated using the QRISK2 algorithm. To determine risk factor levels required to exceed the risk threshold for statin therapy, and to estimate the number of adults in England who would require statin therapy under the guidelines. Cross-sectional study using a sample representative of the English population aged 30-84 years. To estimate 10-year CVD risk different combinations of risk factor levels were entered into the QRISK2 algorithm. The NICE guidelines were applied to the sample using data from the Health Survey for England 2011. Even with optimal risk factor levels, males of different ethnicities would exceed the 10% risk threshold between the ages of 60 and 70 years, and females would exceed the threshold between 65 and 75 years. Under the NICE guidelines, 11.8 million males and females (37% of the adults aged 30-84 years) would require statin therapy, most of them (9.8 million) for primary prevention. When analysed by age, 95% of males and 66% of females without CVD in ages 60-74 years, including all males and females in ages 75-84 years, would require statin therapy. Under the 2014 NICE guidelines, 11.8 million (37%) adults in England aged 30-84 years, including almost all males >60 years in all females >75 years, require statin therapy.

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Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 285. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2017.
All research outputs
#22,547
of 8,422,914 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#8
of 1,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,534
of 220,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#3
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,422,914 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,956 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,918 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.