↓ Skip to main content

A semi-synthetic organism with an expanded genetic alphabet.

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, May 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
1178 Mendeley
citeulike
13 CiteULike
Title
A semi-synthetic organism with an expanded genetic alphabet.
Published in
Nature, May 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature13314
Pubmed ID
Authors

Denis A. Malyshev, Kirandeep Dhami, Thomas Lavergne, Tingjian Chen, Nan Dai, Jeremy M. Foster, Ivan R. Corrêa, Floyd E. Romesberg, Ivan R. Corrêa, Jr., Malyshev DA, Dhami K, Lavergne T, Chen T, Dai N, Foster JM, Corrêa IR, Romesberg FE

Abstract

Organisms are defined by the information encoded in their genomes, and since the origin of life this information has been encoded using a two-base-pair genetic alphabet (A-T and G-C). In vitro, the alphabet has been expanded to include several unnatural base pairs (UBPs). We have developed a class of UBPs formed between nucleotides bearing hydrophobic nucleobases, exemplified by the pair formed between d5SICS and dNaM (d5SICS-dNaM), which is efficiently PCR-amplified and transcribed in vitro, and whose unique mechanism of replication has been characterized. However, expansion of an organism's genetic alphabet presents new and unprecedented challenges: the unnatural nucleoside triphosphates must be available inside the cell; endogenous polymerases must be able to use the unnatural triphosphates to faithfully replicate DNA containing the UBP within the complex cellular milieu; and finally, the UBP must be stable in the presence of pathways that maintain the integrity of DNA. Here we show that an exogenously expressed algal nucleotide triphosphate transporter efficiently imports the triphosphates of both d5SICS and dNaM (d5SICSTP and dNaMTP) into Escherichia coli, and that the endogenous replication machinery uses them to accurately replicate a plasmid containing d5SICS-dNaM. Neither the presence of the unnatural triphosphates nor the replication of the UBP introduces a notable growth burden. Lastly, we find that the UBP is not efficiently excised by DNA repair pathways. Thus, the resulting bacterium is the first organism to propagate stably an expanded genetic alphabet.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 698 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 64 5%
United Kingdom 20 2%
Germany 12 1%
France 11 <1%
Canada 6 <1%
Switzerland 6 <1%
Italy 5 <1%
Spain 5 <1%
Japan 5 <1%
Other 50 4%
Unknown 994 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 374 32%
Researcher 248 21%
Student > Bachelor 179 15%
Student > Master 139 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 53 4%
Other 185 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 645 55%
Chemistry 175 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 137 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 3%
Engineering 37 3%
Other 145 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1683. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2017.
All research outputs
#531
of 8,417,951 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#130
of 48,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12
of 180,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#1
of 903 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,417,951 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 48,099 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 75.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 180,222 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 903 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.