↓ Skip to main content

Sensitizing properties of proteins: executive summary

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Sensitizing properties of proteins: executive summary
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, April 2014
DOI 10.1186/2045-7022-4-10
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lars K Poulsen, Gregory S Ladics, Scott McClain, Nancy G Doerrer, Ronald van Ree

Abstract

The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary scientists from academia, government, and industry participated in the symposium. Experts provided overviews on known mechanisms by which proteins in food may cause sensitization, discussed experimental models to predict protein sensitizing potential, and explored whether such experimental techniques may be applicable in regulatory settings. Three accompanying reviews address critical factors and methods for assessing allergic sensitization: 1) food-and protein-related factors; 2) host-specific factors and 3) screening methods, i.e., the ability of experimental models to predict the sensitizing potential of proteins and whether such models are applicable within regulatory settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Other 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2014.
All research outputs
#5,992,188
of 11,621,608 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#227
of 346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,204
of 188,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#4
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,621,608 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 346 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.