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Wine glass size and wine sales: a replication study in two bars

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Wine glass size and wine sales: a replication study in two bars
Published in
BMC Research Notes, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-2610-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Pechey, Dominique-Laurent Couturier, Gareth J. Hollands, Eleni Mantzari, Zorana Zupan, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

Wine glass size may influence perceived volume and subsequently purchasing and consumption. Using a larger glass to serve the same portions of wine was found to increase wine sales by 9.4% (95% CI 1.9, 17.5) in a recent study conducted in one bar. The current study aimed to replicate this previous work in two other bars using a wider range of glass sizes. To match the previous study, a repeated multiple treatment reversal design, during which wine was served in glasses of the same design but different sizes, was used. The study was conducted in two bars in Cambridge, England, using glass sizes of 300, 370, 510 ml (Bar 1) and 300 and 510 ml (Bar 2). Customers purchased their choice of a 750 ml bottle, or standard UK measures of 125, 175 or 250 ml of wine, each of which was served with the same glass. Bar 1 Daily wine volume (ml) purchased was 10.5% (95% CI 1.0, 20.9) higher when sold in 510 ml compared to 370 ml glasses; but sales were not significantly higher with 370 ml versus 300 ml glasses (6.5%, 95% CI -5.2, 19.6). Bar 2 Findings were inconclusive as to whether daily wine purchased differed when using 510 ml versus 300 ml glasses (-1.1%, 95% CI -12.6, 11.9). These results provide a partial replication of previous work showing that introducing larger glasses (without manipulating portion size) increases purchasing. Understanding the mechanisms by which wine glass size influences consumption may elucidate when the effect can be expected and when not. Trial registration This study is a replication study, based on the procedure set out in the trial registration for the study that it attempts to replicate (ISRCTN registry: ISRCTN12018175).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 50%
Student > Master 3 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Computer Science 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,774,297
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#296
of 2,728 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,617
of 269,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#8
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,728 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,808 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.